Travel News: More Lindblad Small-Ship Expeditions coming your way

Tourism Giant Thomas Cook Stops Selling Tickets To SeaWorld

Travelwirenews reports Animal advocates are celebrating another big win for captive whales and dolphins with an announcement from tourism company Thomas Cook that it will no longer be selling tickets to any attractions that keep Orcas in captivity. Last year the company announced a new animal welfare policy and began auditing 49 of the facilities it sells tickets to in an effort to see if they met the standards set by the Association of British Travel Agents. In all 29 of them failed, and the company stopped selling tickets to them. Now, the company is amending that policy over concerns about welfare and changes in what people consider acceptable and has officially announced it will no longer be selling tickets to facilities that keep Orcas in captivity as of next summer, which includes SeaWorld in the U.S. and Loro Parque in Spain.

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New Tourism Taxes Have Made Holidays To Barbados More Expensive

Travelwirenews reports Holidays to the Barbados has gotten more expensive with new tourism taxes. As of July 1, tourists were hit with a new hotel tax, equal to US$2.50 to US$10 per night, depending on the class of accommodation. This new tax comes on top of an “airline travel and tourism development fee” of US$70 that will be applied to passengers flying to destinations outside the Caribbean as of October 1, and a 2.5% levy applied to “direct tourism services” like car rental services. The additional taxes are meant to help offset the island’s government debts. For the average family staying an average of 12 nights, the additional tax could add US$240 to their hotel bill. The additional room levy will be collected at the resort and hotels until 2020, when the VAT doubles to 15%.

Lindblad Positive On Expanding Expedition Demand

National Geographic Explorer reports Lindblad Expeditions reported positive second quarter earnings on Thursday morning, with Sven-Olof Lindblad, president and CEO, continuing to paint a picture of a strong demand environment for expedition travel. “I know new entrants and new ships are (coming) at an unprecedented level,” Lindblad said, noting the capacity increase in the expedition market in the next two years was still less than the introduction of one mass market ship. While some of those new ships will replace older inventory, Lindblad said the additional capacity will drive marketing and interest across the sector. For 2019 Lindblad said he was expecting a stronger South Pacific season as the company was able to rebalance capacity to maximize revenue opportunities. Across the globe, the company is also eyeing building up deployment in Egypt, citing strong demand. “Creating new geographic opportunities is a key ingredient to sustain growth,” Lindblad said, speaking on the company’s second quarter earnings call. A July deal to build a second blue-water expedition ship was based on increasing demand for high-quality expedition travel, Lindblad explained, as the company will get new 126-passenger polar-class ships in 2020 and 2021, respectively. The company has an option on a third vessel as well. “We have done diligent research,” he said, referring to the 126-guest ship size. “Once you cross over into larger numbers the opportunities (to land guests) diminish dramatically.”

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Hot Weather In Europe Causes Low Water, Prompts River Cruise Itinerary Changes

Cruise Critic UK reports unusually hot weather in Europe is affecting river cruises, causing lines to swap ships between different port cities, change itineraries and use buses to take passengers to various sites. The issues are primarily on Germany’s Elbe River, which historically has had low water issues, and parts of the Danube River north of Passau. The Rhine River is also low, with daily fluctuating levels. River cruise lines handle low water levels in a number of ways, doing their best to keep as close to the itinerary as possible. Ports often close with little advance notice, with the local officials making the determination, leading to last-minute decisions by the line. It’s also hard to predict which season water issues will arise, as it’s entirely dependent on the weather. Sometimes high water strikes in the spring, when snow melts in the Alps, but that’s not always a given (and it wasn’t this year). Low water is generally more common in the fall, but a hot summer can cause issues earlier. Conversely, a particularly stormy summer can cause flooding. The most common, and least disruptive, practice for cruise lines is to keep identical ships as floating hotels in various ports. That way, when passengers swap ships, they have the same cabin category and amenities.

Florida Suffers Worst Red Tide In Over A Decade

Travelmole reports holidaymakers in Florida are being warned to take care as the worst outbreak of red tide in over a decade is affecting its beaches. Officials fear the toxic algae bloom, which is affecting at least 120 miles of beaches on the Gulf of Mexico, could last until 2019. It has already killed thousands of fish, hundreds of sea turtles, and also pelicans and manatees. It poses health risks to beachgoers, particularly those with severe or chronic respiratory conditions, such as emphysema or asthma. The algae can cause rashes and eye irritation, nausea, vomiting and allergy-like symptoms in humans, while drinking water with the toxins can cause long-term liver disease. Last month, Governor Rick Scott declared a state of emergency for seven counties after the algae blooms tainted the water in the wake of discharges from Lake Okeechobee. This gave state environmental and tourism agencies more resources to respond to problems caused by the algae. The red tide, which usually goes away in the spring, has persisted for nine months. According to US reports, the worst bloom in 2006 lasted 17 months.

The UK Has Updated Its Travel Advice For Portugal

The UK Foreign Office has updated its advice for Portugal following three days of forest fires in the Algarve. Portuguese authorities are evacuating affected areas in and round the town of Monchique. “If you are in this area, follow the instructions of the Portuguese police and Civil Protection authorities,” the FCO told British visitors. “For your own safety, travel to the Monchique area is not advised under any circumstances until cleared by the Portuguese authorities.” Flames have already consumed more than 1,000 hectares of forest despite efforts by more than 800 firefighters. Wildfires in Portugal killed more than a hundred people last year. This year authorities were quick to act with evacuations.

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Croatia Is Latest EU Country To Increase Tourist Tax

Travelwirenews reports Croatia is the latest destination to announce an increase in its tourist tax, in an effort to mitigate the impact of its growing holiday industry. The country will raise its visitor levy from 8 kuna (€1.08) per night to 10 kuna (€1.35) from next year. The new rate will apply to all accommodation during peak season, with the exception of campsites. Gari Cappelli, the country’s tourism minister and president of the Croatian tourist board, said money raised would be distributed to the Red Cross, the tourist board and destinations within the country. While the new levy will add just £3.23 per person onto the cost of a fortnight’s holiday, or approximately €18.90 for the two weeks, it’s part of a wider move by holiday destinations to raise tourist taxes. This year, the Balearic Islands of Majorca, Ibiza, Menorca and Formentera doubled their daily tax on tourists in peak season to up to €4 per night. Earlier this summer Barbados announced that it was increasing its visitor levy, which could see families pay €224 extra for a fortnight’s stay. While many destinations impose such taxes to support sustainable tourism, Barbados is doing so to raise money to reduce its overwhelming deficit. Edinburgh is looking to become the first UK destination to introduce a tourist tax. The council claims it would use the money to improve the city’s infrastructure, which is struggling to cope with a surge in visitors.

National Geographic Partners with Ponant to Develop Global Expedition Cruising

Cruise Critic reports National Geographic Expeditions and Ponant have announced a new range of co-branded, luxury expedition cruises on small ships with a common vision for responsible travel and unique experiences. The 130 itineraries, to be offered over the next four years, cover all seven continents. Core destinations are the Arctic and Antarctic, complemented by a range of expeditions in northern Australia, the South Pacific, Alaska, the Seychelles and the Caribbean. Unusual options to some of the world’s most remote locations include Antarctica to Africa (Ushuaia to Cape Town) and Fiji to Guam via Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Micronesia. A 10-night ‘Top End’ cruise sails from Darwin to Cairns stopping at several Aboriginal communities. The new strategic partnership specifically targets travellers in Australia, New Zealand and Asia Pacific and does not impact National Geographic’s partnership with Lindblad Expeditions in the Americas. Expeditions will be conducted on Ponant’s ‘clean ships’, which are designed to respect the environment and marine life, with capacity for 180 to 240 passengers as well as National Geographic photographers and other relevant experts onboard. Ponant is committed to recycling and reuse programs, reduced exhaust emissions and sustainable purchasing practices. Some of the latest ships will also have the line’s new multi-sensory underwater lounge. Available to book now, the new cruises are priced from AU$4,730 per person. A portion of all proceeds is returned to the non-profit National Geographic Society.

American Song, New Orleans’ First Modern Riverboat, Is Nearly Complete

Cruise Industry News reports American Song is nearly finished with construction and will arrive in New Orleans in October 2018. The vessel is one of two modern riverboats American Cruise Lines will debut in New Orleans over the next year. The 190-passenger riverboat, owned by American Cruise Lines, has sailed from its outfitting basin at Chesapeake Shipbuilding in Salisbury, Maryland to the yard’s outfitting bulkhead, where it will receive final touches, according to a news release. It will sail its inaugural Mississippi River cruise from New Orleans in October. American Song has a range of modern features including a rotating, retractable gangway that extends from the bow, which is designed to open for boarding and disembarking. It is one of two new, top-of-the-line riverboats being built by American Cruise Lines, both of which will launch in New Orleans. American Harmony, its sister ship, is currently under construction and will go into service on the Mississippi River in 2019. American Song will sail from New Orleans through the end of this year before it relocates to the Pacific Northwest in 2019. American Song and American Harmony have a new design that eliminates the paddlewheel and adds luxury features, including new grand suites with 900 square feet of private space, large windows and a wraparound balcony. Of the boat’s 102 staterooms, the grand suite is the most expensive, running more than $9,000 for a seven-night cruise from Memphis to New Orleans. The company also plans to have two paddlewheel boats operating from New Orleans by October, America, a 185-passenger boat, and Queen of the Mississippi, a 150-passenger boat. American Song’s inaugural cruise departs New Orleans on Oct. 6.

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Filed under Cruises, Europe, Lindblad Expeditions, portugal

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