Category Archives: Lindblad Expeditions

Travel News: More Lindblad Small-Ship Expeditions coming your way

Tourism Giant Thomas Cook Stops Selling Tickets To SeaWorld

Travelwirenews reports Animal advocates are celebrating another big win for captive whales and dolphins with an announcement from tourism company Thomas Cook that it will no longer be selling tickets to any attractions that keep Orcas in captivity. Last year the company announced a new animal welfare policy and began auditing 49 of the facilities it sells tickets to in an effort to see if they met the standards set by the Association of British Travel Agents. In all 29 of them failed, and the company stopped selling tickets to them. Now, the company is amending that policy over concerns about welfare and changes in what people consider acceptable and has officially announced it will no longer be selling tickets to facilities that keep Orcas in captivity as of next summer, which includes SeaWorld in the U.S. and Loro Parque in Spain.

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New Tourism Taxes Have Made Holidays To Barbados More Expensive

Travelwirenews reports Holidays to the Barbados has gotten more expensive with new tourism taxes. As of July 1, tourists were hit with a new hotel tax, equal to US$2.50 to US$10 per night, depending on the class of accommodation. This new tax comes on top of an “airline travel and tourism development fee” of US$70 that will be applied to passengers flying to destinations outside the Caribbean as of October 1, and a 2.5% levy applied to “direct tourism services” like car rental services. The additional taxes are meant to help offset the island’s government debts. For the average family staying an average of 12 nights, the additional tax could add US$240 to their hotel bill. The additional room levy will be collected at the resort and hotels until 2020, when the VAT doubles to 15%.

Lindblad Positive On Expanding Expedition Demand

National Geographic Explorer reports Lindblad Expeditions reported positive second quarter earnings on Thursday morning, with Sven-Olof Lindblad, president and CEO, continuing to paint a picture of a strong demand environment for expedition travel. “I know new entrants and new ships are (coming) at an unprecedented level,” Lindblad said, noting the capacity increase in the expedition market in the next two years was still less than the introduction of one mass market ship. While some of those new ships will replace older inventory, Lindblad said the additional capacity will drive marketing and interest across the sector. For 2019 Lindblad said he was expecting a stronger South Pacific season as the company was able to rebalance capacity to maximize revenue opportunities. Across the globe, the company is also eyeing building up deployment in Egypt, citing strong demand. “Creating new geographic opportunities is a key ingredient to sustain growth,” Lindblad said, speaking on the company’s second quarter earnings call. A July deal to build a second blue-water expedition ship was based on increasing demand for high-quality expedition travel, Lindblad explained, as the company will get new 126-passenger polar-class ships in 2020 and 2021, respectively. The company has an option on a third vessel as well. “We have done diligent research,” he said, referring to the 126-guest ship size. “Once you cross over into larger numbers the opportunities (to land guests) diminish dramatically.”

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Hot Weather In Europe Causes Low Water, Prompts River Cruise Itinerary Changes

Cruise Critic UK reports unusually hot weather in Europe is affecting river cruises, causing lines to swap ships between different port cities, change itineraries and use buses to take passengers to various sites. The issues are primarily on Germany’s Elbe River, which historically has had low water issues, and parts of the Danube River north of Passau. The Rhine River is also low, with daily fluctuating levels. River cruise lines handle low water levels in a number of ways, doing their best to keep as close to the itinerary as possible. Ports often close with little advance notice, with the local officials making the determination, leading to last-minute decisions by the line. It’s also hard to predict which season water issues will arise, as it’s entirely dependent on the weather. Sometimes high water strikes in the spring, when snow melts in the Alps, but that’s not always a given (and it wasn’t this year). Low water is generally more common in the fall, but a hot summer can cause issues earlier. Conversely, a particularly stormy summer can cause flooding. The most common, and least disruptive, practice for cruise lines is to keep identical ships as floating hotels in various ports. That way, when passengers swap ships, they have the same cabin category and amenities.

Florida Suffers Worst Red Tide In Over A Decade

Travelmole reports holidaymakers in Florida are being warned to take care as the worst outbreak of red tide in over a decade is affecting its beaches. Officials fear the toxic algae bloom, which is affecting at least 120 miles of beaches on the Gulf of Mexico, could last until 2019. It has already killed thousands of fish, hundreds of sea turtles, and also pelicans and manatees. It poses health risks to beachgoers, particularly those with severe or chronic respiratory conditions, such as emphysema or asthma. The algae can cause rashes and eye irritation, nausea, vomiting and allergy-like symptoms in humans, while drinking water with the toxins can cause long-term liver disease. Last month, Governor Rick Scott declared a state of emergency for seven counties after the algae blooms tainted the water in the wake of discharges from Lake Okeechobee. This gave state environmental and tourism agencies more resources to respond to problems caused by the algae. The red tide, which usually goes away in the spring, has persisted for nine months. According to US reports, the worst bloom in 2006 lasted 17 months.

The UK Has Updated Its Travel Advice For Portugal

The UK Foreign Office has updated its advice for Portugal following three days of forest fires in the Algarve. Portuguese authorities are evacuating affected areas in and round the town of Monchique. “If you are in this area, follow the instructions of the Portuguese police and Civil Protection authorities,” the FCO told British visitors. “For your own safety, travel to the Monchique area is not advised under any circumstances until cleared by the Portuguese authorities.” Flames have already consumed more than 1,000 hectares of forest despite efforts by more than 800 firefighters. Wildfires in Portugal killed more than a hundred people last year. This year authorities were quick to act with evacuations.

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Croatia Is Latest EU Country To Increase Tourist Tax

Travelwirenews reports Croatia is the latest destination to announce an increase in its tourist tax, in an effort to mitigate the impact of its growing holiday industry. The country will raise its visitor levy from 8 kuna (€1.08) per night to 10 kuna (€1.35) from next year. The new rate will apply to all accommodation during peak season, with the exception of campsites. Gari Cappelli, the country’s tourism minister and president of the Croatian tourist board, said money raised would be distributed to the Red Cross, the tourist board and destinations within the country. While the new levy will add just £3.23 per person onto the cost of a fortnight’s holiday, or approximately €18.90 for the two weeks, it’s part of a wider move by holiday destinations to raise tourist taxes. This year, the Balearic Islands of Majorca, Ibiza, Menorca and Formentera doubled their daily tax on tourists in peak season to up to €4 per night. Earlier this summer Barbados announced that it was increasing its visitor levy, which could see families pay €224 extra for a fortnight’s stay. While many destinations impose such taxes to support sustainable tourism, Barbados is doing so to raise money to reduce its overwhelming deficit. Edinburgh is looking to become the first UK destination to introduce a tourist tax. The council claims it would use the money to improve the city’s infrastructure, which is struggling to cope with a surge in visitors.

National Geographic Partners with Ponant to Develop Global Expedition Cruising

Cruise Critic reports National Geographic Expeditions and Ponant have announced a new range of co-branded, luxury expedition cruises on small ships with a common vision for responsible travel and unique experiences. The 130 itineraries, to be offered over the next four years, cover all seven continents. Core destinations are the Arctic and Antarctic, complemented by a range of expeditions in northern Australia, the South Pacific, Alaska, the Seychelles and the Caribbean. Unusual options to some of the world’s most remote locations include Antarctica to Africa (Ushuaia to Cape Town) and Fiji to Guam via Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Micronesia. A 10-night ‘Top End’ cruise sails from Darwin to Cairns stopping at several Aboriginal communities. The new strategic partnership specifically targets travellers in Australia, New Zealand and Asia Pacific and does not impact National Geographic’s partnership with Lindblad Expeditions in the Americas. Expeditions will be conducted on Ponant’s ‘clean ships’, which are designed to respect the environment and marine life, with capacity for 180 to 240 passengers as well as National Geographic photographers and other relevant experts onboard. Ponant is committed to recycling and reuse programs, reduced exhaust emissions and sustainable purchasing practices. Some of the latest ships will also have the line’s new multi-sensory underwater lounge. Available to book now, the new cruises are priced from AU$4,730 per person. A portion of all proceeds is returned to the non-profit National Geographic Society.

American Song, New Orleans’ First Modern Riverboat, Is Nearly Complete

Cruise Industry News reports American Song is nearly finished with construction and will arrive in New Orleans in October 2018. The vessel is one of two modern riverboats American Cruise Lines will debut in New Orleans over the next year. The 190-passenger riverboat, owned by American Cruise Lines, has sailed from its outfitting basin at Chesapeake Shipbuilding in Salisbury, Maryland to the yard’s outfitting bulkhead, where it will receive final touches, according to a news release. It will sail its inaugural Mississippi River cruise from New Orleans in October. American Song has a range of modern features including a rotating, retractable gangway that extends from the bow, which is designed to open for boarding and disembarking. It is one of two new, top-of-the-line riverboats being built by American Cruise Lines, both of which will launch in New Orleans. American Harmony, its sister ship, is currently under construction and will go into service on the Mississippi River in 2019. American Song will sail from New Orleans through the end of this year before it relocates to the Pacific Northwest in 2019. American Song and American Harmony have a new design that eliminates the paddlewheel and adds luxury features, including new grand suites with 900 square feet of private space, large windows and a wraparound balcony. Of the boat’s 102 staterooms, the grand suite is the most expensive, running more than $9,000 for a seven-night cruise from Memphis to New Orleans. The company also plans to have two paddlewheel boats operating from New Orleans by October, America, a 185-passenger boat, and Queen of the Mississippi, a 150-passenger boat. American Song’s inaugural cruise departs New Orleans on Oct. 6.

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Gavi visits Alaska with Lindblad Expeditions

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A few weeks ago, WIT Agent Gavi joined Lindblad Expeditions on a trip to Southeast Alaska. Read on for her review of the ship and the ports of call. 

For two golden hours on a mid-May evening, I chased the Canadian sunset northward. I left behind clouds spread beneath me like fractured glass and entered Southeast Alaska: a land of glowing snow-dusted ridges, jagged peaks, frozen lakes, ice fields, fjords and mist. I spent the next week with Lindblad Expeditions, exploring Southeast Alaska’s fjords and glaciers from the 62-passenger National Geographic Sea Bird.

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SITKA

The town of Sitka nestles into Baranof Island’s eastern edge. It’s home to a small main street, which contains a well-stocked outdoor store (filled with any high-end brands you could ever want and an entire wall of rubber boots), an organic creperie, a coffee shop, and a few souvenir galleries (save your shopping for Juneau, although one of the shops does have a full mammoth skull on display, tusks and all). Two places in the town warrant time set aside for a visit:

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  • The raptor center happens to be one of the best wildlife rehabilitation centers I’ve ever seen. They have a symbiotic relationship with tourism in the town: it thrives because it’s able to charge admission to cover costs of an incredible operation. Flight training rooms have creeks to cover noise and one-way windows. Birds unable to fly are kept in expansive open-topped enclosures. The center has educational and hospital facilities, and permanent homes are found for all animals unable to be released.
  • Totem Park: This beautiful national historic park lies 10-15 minutes’ walk from the Sitka town center. The trails in this forested area are lined with totem poles that have been relocated from throughout Southeast Alaska for the sake of cultural preservation and education.

 

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THE CRUISE

The Boat: This boat is a smaller, expedition-style ship, which means we were able to go a lot of places many larger cruise ships were simply unable to navigate. It had a compact set-up, with several different communal areas that made it easy to get to know fellow passengers.

The lounge is cozy: it has lots of smaller tables with rotating armchairs, as well as padded benches around the edges. One large screen and several other screens set up throughout, so you can see presentations no matter where you’re sitting. There is a comprehensive library with literature relevant to the cruise area: natural history, cultural history, guidebooks and other reference materials. There was also a basket of novels (take one/leave one style).

The dining room was classy and practical. No assigned seating, so mingling and getting to know people was easy. Mix of round and rectangular tables.

There were wrap-around outside observation areas on the main deck as well as in front of the bridge, allowing a vantage point for anyone who wanted a view.

An area on the back of the third deck had a sun/rain cover and fitness equipment: three fitness machines, weights, foam rollers, yoga mats and some other things.

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The Rooms: Comfiest. Beds. Ever. Cabins could be termed either “small” or “cozy,” depending how you look at it, but this is to be expected on a yacht-style expedition ship. Bathrooms are “wet” style, where the shower and toilet are right next to each other (a curtain can be drawn to keep the toilet and paper dry). Plenty of storage beneath the bed, and there is also a cabinet with several hangers and a shelf. Amenities include bath scrubby, conditioner and lip balm, your own steel water bottle to take home, and there are shampoo and soap dispensers in the shower. A small clothesline is provided that reaches across the bathroom.

Onboard Activities: Largely educational, focused on photography and local history (both natural and cultural), and conservation. Each Lindblad expedition has a Certified Photo Instructor on board (some select programs also have a National Geographic photographer). The photo instructor on our expedition had extensive experience all over the world, and is currently involved in the continuation of time-lapse projects used to document glaciers’ retreat (used in the 2014 documentary Chasing Ice).

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During our trip, the instructor let a fantastic intro to photography session on the first day, followed by breakout sessions determined by camera style and experience. There were also evening lectures presented by onboard naturalists: some of the programs on this voyage included: marine mammal behavior and current research, history of fur trading in the region, formation of the area (including past, current and future hydrogeology), and Native American totem poles of the Pacific Coast. These programs reflected a set of naturalists with diverse strengths, and their passion and knowledge easily showed through their work.

There was great demo gear available on the boat including binoculars, camera bodies and lenses.

Morning yoga and stretching sessions on the back deck for those so inclined, and there was a wellness specialist on board who was available to book massages. The boat had an “open bridge” policy, as long as we weren’t navigating something tricky or pulling into/out of harbor: this was an amazing opportunity to look over maps and monitors and ask questions about navigation. It also provided a way to watch our surroundings from one of the best seats in the house, in a nice warm room shielded from any weather outside.

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Excursions: In general, two per day: one in the morning and one in the evening. We had a variety of choices for each excursion, catered toward different physical levels. Some examples include:

  • Short, medium or long hikes
  • Stand up paddleboarding, Kayaking or Zodiac tours
  • Hiking, Kayaking or Zodiak tours
  • Hiking, cultural visit with river float, town time or flightseeing (port day in Haines)

It is important to remember that, due to nature of the location, schedule and location of excursions on an expedition-style cruise is fluid. Excursions may be adjusted based on any of the following: wilderness restrictions (only a certain number of people allowed on land at a time), weather, wildlife (boats are not allowed in areas where seals are pupping), accessibility (areas with established trails will allow longer hikes than coves with no established trail), and ability of the “slowest” person in a group.

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The food: was phenomenal, especially from the perspective of a girl who usually looks to the “apply heat and consume” philosophy. Responsibly sourced. Breakfast and lunch usually consisted of healthy buffets with a wide variety, and dinner was sit-down with a choice of three protein options which changed daily. Portions were small compared to usual classic American meals, but no one ever left feeling hungry. Light snacks were available throughout the day: cookies, trail mix, afternoon hors d’oeuvres. Dietary needs were all catered to beautifully.

The drinks: Free coffee, tea, hot chocolate, chai latte mix, and anything you can make with a cappuccino machine, any time of day or night. Alcohol was not included: there is an honor tally sheet for beers from the fridge, and a bar tab kept on your on-board account. However, wine was comped on the first and last nights, and beer was comped at the first lunch. Alcohol was included free of charge on three other occasions:

  • During our port day in Haines, we were given credit for drinks at one brewery and one distillery.
  • We returned from a cold zodiac tour and the bartender was waiting at the sign-in board with a vat of apple cider and your choice of Captain Morgan or… some other liquor.
  • Half way through the zodiac tour to the glacier, another zodiac full of crew dressed as Vikings “raided” our boat and distributed hot chocolate with a choice between three alcohols, and whip.

The vibe, overall: relaxed and casual.

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Some Things to Note: 

  • If you have kids: your best Lindblad option will be an Alaska or Galapagos program, which will have a dedicated “Global Explorers” kid-specific program and naturalist on board. On trips without a “Global Explorers” program, activities are not generally geared toward the younger generation (ex: evening lectures rather than entertainment with other companies). If a child is uninterested in an activity and wishes to stay behind, a parental unit will need to accompany the child and be responsible for them.
  • These are not ADA accessible cruises.
  • Remember to pack:
    • A waterproof cover for your day pack.
    • Three pairs of shoes:
      • sturdy, knee-high rubber boots (required),
      • tennis shoes, and
      • “camp shoes” for on the boat. (if your tennis get wet, you’ll be wearing your rubber boots everywhere on board, even when you want to relax).
    • A long string to use as an additional clothesline in your cabin. There is no electric dryer on board, and this will be a lifesaver after rainy expeditions.
    • Lots of warm layers (including gloves, hats, scarf): while Southeast Alaska has some absolutely stunning days, any time of year can also have cold, windy and rainy days. Zodiac tours can be a long activity, exposed with no movement, so you can get cold fast without the right clothing.

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JUNEAU

Alaska’s state capital has a few things worth doing:

On a clear day, take the tram up Mt. Roberts: this has a beautiful view down the channel and some trails at the top. Admission is covered by Lindblad.

While most “galleries” in town are maintained by cruise companies, there are two or three worth visiting:

  • Mt. Juneau Trading Post: Family trading post maintained for generations by a Tlingit family. Old and new art from all over the Northwest coast, ranging from $5 to the sky. If you love art, you can get lost in here for hours.
  • Trickster: Northwest Coast art designed and applied to modern purposes: skateboards, home décor, jewelry, apparel, etc.

Some other Juneau activities: The Mendenhall Ice Caves are a full-day excursion with a local company, accessible only by first kayaking and then climbing over ice. There is also flightseeing available in Juneau.

It’s worth an extra half-day in Juneau to see the galleries and Mt. Roberts tram (arriving the night before you embark, or catching a later flight the day you disembark). For any further activities, you will need to allow an additional day in the city.

 

 

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Conscientious Traveler: Lindblad Expeditions

Welcome back to Conscientious Traveler–our monthly series in which we showcase a fantastic travel organization that supports humanitarian and/or environmental work. This month May is all about Lindblad Expeditions!

Lindblad Expeditions offers cruises emphasizing eco-tourism, adventure and conservation efforts around the globe. Travelers choose the cruise line for their on-ship education and intimate experiences with amazing wildlife and environments. They’ve partnered up with National Geographic to showcase earth-friendly destinations and projects around the globe.

Lindblad has raised more than $12 million to conversation initiatives worldwide. Projects cover everything from community development to ecological programs in Antarctica, Baja, Galapagos, Patagonia, Amazon and other areas around the globe.

Click here to read in-depth of all the donated programs!

Willamette Intl Travel has sent clients on Lindblad Expeditions for years now. Call now for an appointment to find out more! 503-224-0180 or email info@wittravel.com. 

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Exciting Sail: 15-Day British/Irish Cruise with Lindblad Expeditions

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Last week we featured lesser known islands on our blog: the Shetlands, Faroes, Orkneys, and Svalbard. Hopefully that got your travel blood a-pumping, because we have a special Lindblad cruise to share with you!

Lindblad Expeditions was founded in the 1950’s and has remained a leading figure in the world of eco-tourism and small ship cruising. The company is dedicated to finding creative ways to explore areas already mapped. Trained naturalists onboard strive to connect their guests with amazing and incredible places through adventure and education. Travelers choose Lindblad because of the on-ship innovative technology, all-inclusive rates, up close and personal experiences, informal atmosphere, hand-crafted itineraries and ecologically minded experts. And their partnership with like-minded National Geographic experts in the peak of their field certainly doesn’t hurt!

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Exploring the British & Irish Isles

15-Day Itinerary

London – Portsmouth – Fowey – Isles of Scilly – Skelligs and Dingle Peninsula – Cliffs of Moher and Aran Islands – County Donegal – Iona and Staffa, Inner Hebrides – Outer Hebrides: St. Kilda and Callanish – Inverewe – Orkney Islands – Fair Isle and Mousa – Shetland Islands – Bergen, Norway

Board the 148-guest National Geographic Explorer in the heart of London to head on an expedition to discover these Isles that few have seen. See tropical gardens, sixth-century Celtic stone huts, towering cliffs thronged with puffins, and remote wild reaches only accessible by expedition ship and Zodiac. Voyage through centuries of culture and experience a magical blend of deep history and vital modernity on a thrilling and unexpected expedition.

– Former Irish Prime Minister and EU Ambassador John Bruton, who was instrumental in the Irish Peace Process, joins the expedition to share his personal insights.

Travel with and learn from acclaimed photographer Sisse Brimberg, who has shot more than 30 stories for National Geographic.

– PLUS an exclusive 7-day Extension in Wales.

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Call our WIT Agents to find out more about this amazing cruise, or to discuss similar options that may be right for you and your family. Reach us at 503-224-0180 or email info@wittravel.com. Photos courtesy of Lindblad Expeditions. 

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Cruise to Antarctica

Antarctica is a land like no other. Covering almost one-tenth of the Earth’s surface, it’s one bucket-list destination never to be missed. Nowhere else on Earth has what Antarctica can offer—the largest concentration of marine wildlife in the world, dramatic scenery, massive icebergs and glaciers. Since you are venturing where few ever do (30,000 tourists per year), you will want to make sure your experience is well-planned and well-suited to your travel preferences. Our agents are careful in ensuring that we match client with company, taking close looks at crew expertise, ship features, expedition activity, and overall quality of experience.

photo by John Lester, Creative Commons

It’s important to be familiar with the ships and routes. Antarctica ships tend to fall in three main categories: small expedition ships with ice-hardened hulls, medium-sized ships and large cruise ships. Smaller ships carry inflatable landing craft (zodiacs) so passengers can venture off the ship and onto land. Itineraries typically sail from Ushuaia across the Drake Passage, and a sailing often includes the South Shetland Islands, South Georgia, around Cape Horn, and the Falklands (though recently some cruise lines have pulled from the Falklands due to territorial disputes). Here are some companies who offer expedition travel to Antarctica, used and approved by our agents:

LINDBLAD

Lars-Eric Lindblad founded Lindblad Expeditions in the late 1950’s, combining his passion for uncharted travel and eco-tourism. The company is dedicated to finding creative ways to explore areas already mapped. Trained naturalists onboard strive to connect their guests with amazing and incredible places through adventure and education. Their partnership with like-minded National Geographic experts on the top of their field allows them to lead the most experienced Ice Team on the National Geographic Explorer. Your ship will be escorted by a team of veteran Naturalists, who will take you on hikes through the icy wild, kayaking in coves and around ice floes, and zodiac cruising among icebergs. Travelers choose Lindblad because of the on-ship innovative technology, all-inclusive rates, up close and personal experiences, informal atmosphere, hand-crafted itineraries and ecologically minded experts. Their partnership with like-minded National Geographic experts in the peak of their field certainly doesn’t hurt!

photo by 23am.com, Creative Commons

HURTIGRUTEN

Hurtigruten offers a step up in exploration travel, combining luxury and expedition. Sail in the wake of historical explorers in the technologically advanced ship MS Fram, and spot the millions of penguins, thousands of seals, and pods of whales that inhabit the waters and shores during the austral summer. The ship’s expedition team will give a series of lectures as you cross the Drake Passage. Each voyage is unique, and the final choice of landings will be made in the course of the sailing. Included with each booking are the cabin, full board meals, flights between Ushuaia and Buenos Aires, and the excursion to Ushuaia National Park.

photo by tonyforster2, Creative Commons

G ADVENTURES

G Adventures has a number of itineraries that delve into the heart of Antarctica’s wilderness and history. They have expeditions from 11-days to intensive 23-days, all of which include: meals, zodiac excursions with expert expedition teams, educational programs, transfers, expert guides and accommodation on board the MS Expedition. Venture out to Shackleton’s final resting place, and sail through the penguin rookeries and seal colonies of Antarctica. Some itineraries even include South Georgia and the Falkland Islands in the sailing, and you can even add on Buenos Aires or Iguassu Falls bookends to your itinerary. G Adventures also supplies waterproof boots for all passengers, and a special Canada Goose expedition jacket for each guest in a Category 5 suite!

Photo by winky in the uk, Creative Commons

GENERAL TOURS

General Tours offers a 15-day itinerary for small, intimate groups venturing deep through Antarctica. The ship’s unique open bridge policy allows passengers to join the ship’s officers on the bridge and learn about navigation, whale watching, enjoying a front-row-seat view of icebergs and snow-capped mountains. Trace the 1901-1903 route of the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, visit Hope Bay and Snow Hill Island, and sail across the peninsula’s remote eastern coast into the remote Weddell Sea. Enrich your sail with insightful lectures on the on board Ship Naturalist. This itinerary includes nights in Buenos Aires and Tierra del Fuego.

photo by Liam Quinn, Creative Commons

SILVERSEA

The medium-sized Silver Explorer was especially designed by Silversea Cruises to navigate the waters of remote destinations. A strengthened hull with an ice-class notation for passenger vessels allows the ship to push through ice floes with ease. An expert Expedition Team will accompany passengers via zodiac ships on to the dramatic continent of Antarctica. Itineraries run from 10 to 22 days, and explore Antarctica as well as the Falkland Islands, South Georgia, South Shetlands, and Tristan da Cunha.

QUARK

Quark Expeditions is based in Seattle. Since 1991 Quark has specialized in polar expeditions, and their ships are specially designed ice-strengthened vessels made for high latitude cruising. They are unique in that they have the largest and most diverse fleet of passenger ships, and deliver more departures and itineraries than any other company. They have itineraries that run from 8 days to as long as a month! Explore the Antarctic Peninsula, visit research stations on Adelaide Island, hike up glaciers and visit penguin rookeries; or see the incredible wildlife of South Georgia, often referred to as “the Galapagos of the South.” Learn about the continent’s unique geology, history and wildlife from an expert team.

It’s never too early to book a sail to Antarctica. Ships and space are limited. Call us now to find out more about a particular sailing or vendor that has one on offer. WIT Agent Christina has traveled to Antarctica and can give you a firsthand account. Call us at 503.224.0180 or email info@wittravel.com.

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Filed under Antarctica, Cruises, G Adventures, General Tours, Hurtigruten, Lindblad Expeditions, Quark, Silversea, Travel by Ship