Tag Archives: unesco

8 New UNESCO World Heritage Sites

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8 New UNESCO World Heritage Sites

We have a bunch of New UNESCO Heritage Sites on the list, to add to our ever-growing bucket list!

All of these cultural and natural landmarks are recognized for their outstanding value to humanity. Discover which wonders made the list this year. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but just a handful of our favorites. Learn more about other sites on the UNESCO official webpage

What are some of YOUR favorite UNESCO World Heritage Sites?

Let us know in the comments!

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1. Naumburg Cathedral, Germany

Built in the 11th century, this gorgeous cathedral is remarkable from a distance for its stain glass windows and soaring Gothic arches. Its real claim to fame, however, is the medieval art inside—including 12 life-sized statues of the cathedral’s founders. The Naumburg Masters was a workshop of sculptors and stonemasons in the 13th century who dedicated their work of realistic sculptures to the cathedral and all over France, Middle Rhine area and boundaries of the German Empire. This is a destination for history buffs — the cathedral and the region around it has a high density of authentic monuments and structures dating back to the High Middle Ages.

2. Chiribiquete National Park, Colombia

Ever-surprising Colombia takes next place with this national park, sometimes called the Maloca (“Amazonian long house”) of the Jaguar. As Colombia’s largest protected site, it protects 10,810 square miles and over 3,000 species of animals and plants. High on the sandstone plateaux, over 75,000 rock paintings have been found. Nature lovers will surely love this one.

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3. Ivrea, Italy

This small Piedmont town near Turin is famous for its 20th century industrial boom in typewriters and computers. Stunning Ivrea is also a remarkably beautiful village, resting on the Dora Baltea river, and, at the time of writing, still off the usual tourists’ map.

4. Caliphate City of Medina Azahara, Spain

The Islamic civilization of Al-Andalus is highlighted all across southern Spain, especially Alhambra. Added to the list of must-sees this year is the Medina Azahara. These ruins, 1.5 hours from Seville, were built between 940 and 975 c.e. and once held the seat of the Caliphate of Cordoba.

5. Barberton Makhonjwa Mountains, South Africa

The Barberton Makhonjwa Mountains are so ancient, with volcanic and sedimentary rocks dating back over 3 billion years. More adventurous travelers will have quite the holiday hiking and biking around the town of Barberton and the nature reserve.

6. The Border of Hedeby and the Danevirke, Germany

Once a Viking trading post, this cultural landscape now consists of the ruins of a 33-km-long fortification–the Danevirke–as well as the archaeological site of the trading town Hedeby. Hedeby rose in power on the major trade routes between the Frankish Empire and Scandinavia, as well as between the Baltic and North Seas.

7. Göbekli Tepe, Turkey

This mysterious archaeological site in southeastern Turkey is the oldest known example of hunter-gatherer settlers in the world. It houses the world’s oldest known megaliths, with around 200 pillars in about 20 circles, and may have the world’s oldest temple as well. Göbekli Tepe dates back to around 9600 and 8200 b.c.e., and is a fascinating glimpse into ancient Mesopotamian culture.

8. Hidden Christian Sites, Japan

Kyushu Island keeps many historical secrets, but its historic Christian community that draws the eye of UNESCO—with 10 villages, Hara castle and cathedral that were built between 16th-19th centuries, despite a ban of all outsiders during the Tokugawa Shogunate. Along with these Christian remnants, visitors can explore active volcanoes, bubbling hot springs and marvelous waterfalls.

What UNESCO World Heritage Sites are you looking forward to seeing in 2018?

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Filed under Asia, Colombia, Europe, France, Germany, Japan, South Africa, Turkey

10 Archaeological Wonders of Malta

malta archaeology travel

The Maltese Islands, floating in the deep sapphire waters of the Mediterranean Sea south of Sicily, are a treasure-trove of history. Over the 3 islands—Malta, Gozo, and Comino—lies a wealth of prehistoric ruins, cathedrals, palaces, catacombs, ancient temples and more to make the history buff squeal with delight. The capital of Valletta is in of itself an exquisite seaport—and much more lies beyond!

WIT Travel Agent Pam traveled to Malta last year and absolutely loved it. Did you catch her feedback? We created a report of her trip so you could get a firsthand taste of Malta. And don’t forget to check out her photos in the Gallery!

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1. Ħaġar Qim

This prehistoric megalithic site dates back to around 3600 b.c.e.! Declared a UNESCO site, with 7-meter megaliths weighing around 20 tons each, the ancient site was obscured until its discovery in 1839. Here a number of feminine idols were found, including a nude Venus of Malta. 

2. Mnajdra

A short 500 meters from Hagar Qim, Mnajdra is another megalithic site with different temples that date back to 3600-2200 b.c.e. Visitors to the site can witness firsthand developing architecture during the Ggantija Phase, the Maltese Bronze Age. The chief attraction of the Mnajdra temples is the Solstices and Equinoxes doorway, which marks the first day of each season.

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3. Ħal-Saflieni Hypogeum

The Hypogeum is a multi-level underground crypt that dates to around 4000 b.c.e. A UNESCO archaeology site, it’s a complex series of catacombs and. Connected chambers. At the center is the chamber of Holy of Holies, and is an amazing state of preservation, with beautiful carvings and paintings in red ochre. Open to the public, but tickets must be reserved well in advance as there’s a limit of 10 visitors every hour. Artifacts from the site can be seen at the National Museum of Archaeology in Valletta.

4. Tarxien Temples

The ruins of four temples, recounting the story of a once-glorious civilization among the dilapidated columns, statues, altars and reliefs. The site expands over 5400 square meters and is an impressed display of Late Neolithic art from the time period between 3600-2500 b.c.e. The Tarxien Temples archaeology site within easy walking distance of Hal Saflieni Hypogeum.

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5. St. Paul’s Catacombs

This ancient Roman underground cemetery complex is a delight to behold. Dating back to the 4th-century c.e., it is comprised of labyrinthine passages and tombs over an area of 2000 square meters. When the Saracens took over in the 9th century, the site was abandoned and made inaccessible until its excavation in 1894.

6. Fort St. Angelo

This medieval fort is a marvelous bastioned fort and castle built during the medieval ages. As it stretches out over the peninsula, it’s an ideal location for panoramic views of the harbor and surrounding seas.

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7. Saint John’s Co-Cathedral

This elegant cathedral was built by the Order of St. John in the 16th-century. Dedicated to Saint John the Baptist, it’s truly a gem of Baroque architecture. The Knights of St. John wanted to rival the great churches of Rome and commissioned art and decorations from grand masters from France, Spain and Italy.

8. Casa Rocca Piccola

This gorgeous 16th-c baroque palace was once home to a noble Maltese family. Another relic from the Knights of St. John, the palace boasts over 50 rooms, Malta’s the largest private collection of antique costumes, two libraries, a chapel and stables. It was called La casa con giardino, the house with a garden, as typically Valletta houses were not allowed. 

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9. Rotunda of Mosta

The 17th-century Catholic Church is a marvel of neoclassical architecture, dedicated to the Assumption of Mary. Designed to rival the Pantheon in Rome, with Ionic columns, two bell towers and an ornamental circular dome. In 1942, a German aerial bomb fell on the church during mass but didn’t explode—a true miracle to the onlookers. A replica of the bomb is on display to visitors.

10. Inquisitor’s Palace

Colloquially known as tal-Inkisitur, the palace was the seat of the Maltese Inquisition from 1574 to 1798. Originally intended to be a courthouse, it was renovated over the centuries to become the elegant and stunning architectural gem of today. It is the only palace of its kind in the world that’s open to the general public.

Thinking of Malta? Why not book a Mediterranean Cruise? Ask our Willamette Intl Travel agents to curate a trip that’s perfectly tailored to you and your family’s needs and budget. 

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Filed under Europe, malta, mediterranean

Fun Facts about South Africa

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Devil’s Peak, cc modified (c) Jim Sher

South Africa: You know wine, you know a bit of the history–but did you know that the country has 3 official capitals? Cape Town, Bloemfontein and Pretoria. Check out more amazing facts below!

Check out our previous post on Cape Town for more on this fascinating country. 

Little-Known Facts about South Africa: 

  • South Africa has the longest wine route in the world.
  • Kruger National Park supports the greatest variety of wildlife species on the African continent.
  • South Africa has the cheapest electricity in the world.
  • The Tugela Falls is the second highest waterfall in the world, where the water tumbles down 2,789 feet.
  • The only street in the world to house two Nobel Peace prizewinners is in Soweto. Nelson Mandela and Archbishop Desmond Tutu both have houses on Vilakazi Street in Soweto.
  • South Africa has the oldest meteor scar in the world, the Vredefort Dome. This is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The oldest remains of modern humans were found in Klasies River Cave in the Eastern Cape. They are well over 100,000 years old.
  • In its eastern part, South Africa entirely surrounds another country – Lesotho, an independent constitutional monarchy.
  • South Africa has 11 official languages, including Zulu, Afrikaans, Xhosa and English.

Last Month WIT Agent Nancy returned from two weeks in South Africa. Stay tuned for a firsthand account of her adventures!

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Race, cc modified (c) Matt MacGillivray

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Filed under South Africa